Lemmington Ltd. Re-Brands LEGO,
Patagonia, & Sun-Maid

October 11, 2016

This week, Lemmington Ltd., a year-old agency already known for revolutionizing the industry, has unveiled re-brands of LEGO, Patagonia, and Sun-Maid.

Ken Lemmington, Founder, CEO, and Chief Design Officer at Lemmington, proudly presented his company’s designs to the press on Monday:

At Lemmington, we energize disruption, subversion, and innovation. We build high-level value for our clients with a content-first, hand-crafted approach that thinks in systems, not outdated models where content was merely prince, and interrogate their brands to deliver a dynamic user experience that speaks for itself, letting the client’s brand simultaneously recede and come forward, and in turn assuring that data, connective strategy, empowering yet sustainable metrics, best practices, and actionable SEO dominate the decisions that drive our bespoke designs.

See Lemmington’s re-brands below.

LEGO

Left: old logo. Right: new logo.

Caroline Sheepley, Media Management Strategist at Lemmington and leader of the LEGO re-brand project, explains the thinking behind this new logo:

It’s obvious to anyone paying attention that LEGO owns the red square. With that in mind, we took the logo back to basics, removing unnecessary flourishes such as the clumsy typeface and yellow outline. Our new lower-case type treatment feels simpler, friendlier, and less cluttered. Most of our branding materials exclude the name of the company: the red square alone is enough to communicate and elevate the LEGO brand.

Patagonia

Top: old logo. Bottom: new logo.

Fred Follower, Disruption Manager at Lemmington and leader of the Patagonia re-brand project, explains the thinking behind this new logo:

It’s obvious to anyone paying attention that Patagonia owns the mountain silhouette. With that in mind, we took the logo back to basics, removing unnecessary flourishes such as the overly literal mountain range and redundant colors. Our new orange triangle, which represents a mountain, feels simpler, friendlier, and less cluttered. Most of our branding materials exclude the name of the company: the orange triangle alone is enough to communicate and elevate the Patagonia brand.

Sun-Maid

Left: old logo. Right: new logo.

Templeton Plate, VP of Collective Consciousness at Lemmington and leader of the Sun-Maid re-brand project, explains the thinking behind this new logo:

It’s obvious to anyone paying attention that Sun-Maid owns the shape of the sun. With that in mind, we took the logo back to basics, removing unnecessary flourishes such as the maid illustration and capitalized type. Our new bonneted smily sun feels simpler, friendlier, and less cluttered. Most of our branding materials exclude the name of the company: the sun alone is enough to communicate and elevate the Sun-Maid brand.

In Conclusion

Lemmington Partner Jorge San Serif says:

Lemmington’s designs are changing the game for UX practitioners, creatives, and coffee drinkers who both push and pull pixels. Let us know what you think in the real-life comments!



N.

This article is satire and does not represent real events or reflect the views of those at LEGO, Patagonia, or Sun-Maid.

Article Edit, 2/1/2017...

As a stylistic tweak, I have added a hyphen to the phrase “re-brand.”

Newer Post Re-Brands, Round 2 Older Post Subjectivity Counts Go to Main Blog Page

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